Japan’s two secret Park Hyatt hotels

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If you peruse the Park Hyatt website you will find that Hyatt lists the Park Hyatt Tokyo as Japan’s lone Park Hyatt. Technically this is true but in reality it is false. There are two properties in Japan that easily meet the Park Hyatt threshold in terms of service, location and overall quality. For reasons I do not understand, these two properties are under the Hyatt Regency umbrella instead.

Brand definition

Let’s quickly review how each Hyatt brand identifies itself via Hyatt.

About Park Hyatt – Park Hyatt expresses sophisticated luxury in a contemporary manner for discerning individuals who want personal service in a refined environment.

About Hyatt Regency
Hyatt Regency enables busy individuals to be productive and revitalized in a responsive, fully-equipped, convenient environment.

The “Park Hyatt Hakone” (Hyatt Regency Hakone Resort and Spa)

The “Park Hyatt Hakone” is a phenomenally gorgeous property situated in a beautiful mountain town underneath Mount Fuji. This luxury resort features an onsen and even a dog in residence, Haru.



Our experience from start to finish was near perfect.


The rooms are beautiful.



The property is beautiful.



The location is hard to match.


This is a Park Hyatt.

The “Park Hyatt” Kyoto (Hyatt Regency Kyoto)

Situated in one of the most beautiful cities in the world, the “Park Hyatt Kyoto” is a category 5 Hyatt property. Like the “Park Hyatt Hakone”, this property meets all the expectations of a Park Hyatt.



The rooms are beautiful.




The location is superb.


And the service is fantastic throughout.  This, too, is a Park Hyatt.

The bottom line

These two properties may say Hyatt Regency on the exterior but they are certainly above their peers.  The “Park Hyatt Hakone” and “Park Hyatt Kyoto” or whatever you want to call them are truly aspirational hotels that are worth every point.  Don’t let anyone convince you otherwise.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or suggestions expressed on this site are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer. This post was accurate at the time of posting, offer may be unavailable on this site at a later time. For details on current offers visit the card issuer’s site.

About alex

Alex loves to travel and does so a lot. Logging 100,000 flight miles each year over the past 4 years, Alex uses points and miles to power his passion. Alex is continuously striving to experience the far reaches of the globe. In his day job, Alex is a Management Consultant frequently on the road advising Technology organizations. I love thinking about, reading about, and talking about all things travel. Feel free to reach me at pmmalex@gmail.com

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  1. The Hakone Hyatt looks absolutely amazing and the view of Fuji-san is stunning. Still on the fence on if I’d trade the ryokan experience for a hotel though.
    For the Kyoto property, is it conveniently located to the tourist locations? That city can be very difficult to get around.

  2. @Joeheg – It has a very central location in the heart of Kyoto with many buses close by and a free one-way taxi service from the JR station. I enjoyed the location better than the Westin for exploring the city. I agree a true Ryokan experience would be more exciting but the price was right at free + points.

  3. We just had a stay at both Hyatts in May. Could not agree more, they were both wonderful hotels. Our first morning of our first day ever in Japan, we woke at 5AM to that awesome view of Fuji-san from the Hakone Hyatt. We loved our two weeks in Japan, and the Hyatt stays were truly a part of one of our best trips ever.

  4. You don’t necessarily have to go bankrupt in Japan, particularly if you have the miles and points to spare. One thing you should buy before going is the JR Rail Pass (only sold outside Japan). If you go from Tokyo to Kyoto/Osaka and back, it will have paid for itself.

  5. I knew the Kyoto one, although I’ve yet to stay at either of these.

    I suppose it’s an oversight, but what types of rooms are these? The Kyoto one looks like a Regency Suite which would cost a few more points (or status) than just any room. 😉

  6. I agree Jon! I was lucky enough to win some of those PMM’s napkins and friends enjoy them at our house with cocktails and nibbles.

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