Warning: Uber to Ban Riders With Low Ratings


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Uber has announced that they will begin banning passengers who have low ratings. The new rule goes into effect for riders in Australia and New Zealand who have below a 4.0 rating. Uber drivers rate passengers on a scale of 1-5 after the ride is completed, similar to how passengers can rate drivers at the end of the ride.

Essentially, you can pretty much expect to get a 5.0 rating if you’re waiting when your driver arrives, you say hello to them when you get in the car, and aren’t obnoxiously drunk or throw up then you should be fine, in addition to a few other factors that could impact your score, but you get the general idea.

In order to view your current Uber rating just open the app and select the menu icon in the upper left hand corner, which will expand the main menu. Your rating will appear at the top of the screen underneath your name. If you’re over a 4.0 then you’re in the clear. If you don’t have a 5.0 rating, you’re not alone see: Why is my Uber Rating so Low?!

Per the BBC,

Uber is to block customers in Australia and New Zealand from its ride service if they have a low passenger rating.
Riders rated four-out-of-five stars or lower will be banned for six months. Ratings are based on feedback left by drivers after each journey.

The same policy was introduced in Brazil earlier this this year, Uber said, but it’s the first time the control has been rolled out in an English-speaking market.

An Uber spokeswoman declined to be drawn on exactly how many of its 2.8 million users in Australia and New Zealand currently had ratings of below 4.0 – but conceded it was only “a few thousand”.

If you do get banned from Uber for a low rating, you’ll have the opportunity to take a short educational exercise on their phones to review proper behavior and then Uber may allow them back on.

See our recent Uber posts:

If you still haven’t tried Uber yet, you can still get a credit towards your first ride with my referral link, here or your credit can be applied to your UberEats order instead!

What are your thoughts on Uber’s new rules in Australia and New Zealand? This hasn’t been rolled out to the United States yet, but it’s possible that it could be. Feel free to share your comments below.

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Comments

  1. I gave a driver in DC a 4 because he took about 30 minutes instead of the 15 the app indicated. He in turn gave me a low rating. What a joke.

  2. If a rider doesn’t wear a seatbelt in my car, they immediately drop to a 1 and work their way up before the ride ends. Wearing a seatbelt is the law and I’m not going to be the one who gets pulled over and stuck with the fine.

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